Dental Implants

 
Single-Tooth Implants

Single-tooth implants can be used in people who are missing one or more teeth. An implant is surgically placed in an opening that is made by your dentist in the jawbone. After the implant integrates (attaches) to your bone, it acts as a new “root” for the crown that will be replacing your missing tooth.

Multiple Tooth Implants

If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw.

 

Implant-Supported Denture

An implant-supported denture is a type of overdenture that is supported by and attached to implants. A regular denture rests on the gums, and is not supported by implants.The implants usually are placed in the jawbone at the front of your mouth because there tends to be more bone in the front of the jaw than in the back.

 

Full Mouth Dental Implants

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them. Dental implants will replace both your lost natural teeth and some of the roots.First, implants, which looks like screws or cylinders, are placed into your jaw. Then, over the next two to six months, the implants and the bone are allowed to bond together to form anchors for your artificial teeth. During this time, a temporary teeth replacement option can be worn over the implant sites.

 

Immediate Loading

In certain cases, immediate loading implant procedures are considered to be a better option than delayed implants. Immediate load implants are exposed to the chewing force immediately after implantation. However, the exact definition of immediate loading may vary from same-day implant loading to a shortly-delayed loading (usually three days to one week) as the manufacturing of a fixed provisory prosthesis might be delayed due to dental lab constraints.

 

Bone Grafting

Bone grafting is a surgical procedure that replaces missing bone in order to repair bone fractures that are extremely complex, pose a significant health risk to the patient, or fail to heal properly.Bone generally has the ability to regenerate completely but requires a very small fracture space or some sort of scaffold to do so.

Sinus Lift Surgery

A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. If you’ve lost bone in that area due to reasons such as periodontal disease or tooth loss, you may be left without enough bone to place implants.